Coffee Cake
Parenting Course - Why Bother?

The longer I work for the NPI, the more I see a hesitation around parenting courses – both running one (will anyone commit to it when life’s so busy?) as well as attending (why would I go on a parenting course!?)

While I can appreciate that the format of a traditional course might not suit everyone, and that there are many places to find good parenting tips and advice - extended family, books and podcasts to name but three, there are some great reasons to attend a parenting course and here are just a few we’ve come up with:

  1.  Chat.  Coffee.  Cake.  Repeat. Since starting work here, I’ve yet to come across an in-person parenting course that doesn’t feature a cuppa and cake.  Isn’t the table central to the ebb and flow of life?  When people gather around food and kind hospitality, conversation happens, connections are made and in time, trust grows.  An in-person parenting course invites conversation, questions and discussion and when this is centred around a particular aspect of parenting, it allows people the opportunity to grow, consider and reflect in a safe environment.
 
  1. Get specific.  Did you know that there are some parenting courses focused on particular areas?  For example, ADHD, ASD or handling anger in the family.  Some churches even run one off sessions on specific topics.  Hearing from trained facilitators and meeting with other parents facing the same issues can be both encouraging and empowering.
 
  1. One thing.  Obviously, parenting courses aren’t a magic wand to wave over your relationship with your child, but what if along the way you learn one thing that helps improve a tricky dynamic or a difficult issue?  Whether it be from something another parent says in passing (happened to me) or a PowerPoint slide from a facilitator, couldn’t we all do with a little help?
 
  1. Why not?  As the old adage goes, knowledge is power.  Just as we might attend a course to learn any new skill, how much more so when we find ourselves responsible for nurturing young life?  Often course facilitators are further on in the journey and have the skills and experience to impart wise teaching for the years ahead.  I guess what I’m saying is, well, why not?
 
  1. Research.  Back in 2019 a study by Kings College London concluded that there was a case for “considerable investment” in parenting programmes.  Prof Stephen Scott from Kings told BBC News that, "Parenting classes should be offered on a much larger scale, recognising that the quality of parent-child relationship is not just about individual psychological wellbeing but also has greater social and financial implications."*  Perhaps attending a course could be impactful for your family not just in the present, but could build a great foundation for the future too.

 
* https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-49879677


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